Our Beginner’s Guide to Succulents

 

Succulents. These Instagram-perfect plants have made the world fall head-over-heels with the Southwestern aesthetic. Have you found yourself fawning over them at your friend’s apartment or in a super-chic magazine, but have no clue where to start? We have gathered all the basics so even the most novice of gardeners can have a swoon-worthy collection of these little guys.

While you search your local garden center, it can be overwhelming to choose which succulent to start with. What color looks best? The weirder the look, the better… right? Those spikes look a little too intense, especially if my dog decides to play with it (and we all know he will be tempted). Ouch! This one actually hurts!

Set all your worries aside as we have cultivated our list of favorites that are friendly to plant:

  • Crassula, the well-known Jade Plant, is Succulents 101. We are certain that you have seen this little guy around, as these plants are virtually impossible to kill. Place them in a spot that can provide full sun as the bright light will help them attain their most vibrant color. During the spring and summer, some provide impressive blooms that will add color to your home.

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  • Echeveria is the king of the patio planters. If you are an aspiring container gardener, then we recommend that you start with an Echeveria. Start by hosting one in your home during the winter months and then gradually move them outside for the summer once the weather settles. They thrive in full sun, but summer afternoon can cause stress to their leaves. Both over- and under-watering can produce wilting, shriveling, and dropping leaves. It is best practice to keep an eye on your plants and adjust watering levels as needed.

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  • Haworthia is also known as the jewel of the succulent kingdom, as their vibrant green leaves add brightness wherever they are. Bright, indirect sunlight serves as the best environment. They can thrive on minimal affection, requiring only a small amount of water (maximum: ¼ a cup). Before watering, make sure the soil is completely dry. Be aware that these plants are prone to mealy bugs, so inspect your plant every so often. If you find one of these pests, spray the plant with a soapy dishwater mixture for two weeks.

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  • Faucaria is also known as the “Tiger Jaws.” And with a nickname like “Tiger Jaws,” how could you go wrong? Faucarias grow mostly in the spring and fall. They require good drainage, but with a little shade, they will do fine even in the harsh Southern heat. Faucarias require watering every few days. When lacking water, the stems start to die.

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Photo via suggestkeyword.com

When planting succulents, you can be as creative as you want.

First, you will want to find the perfect bowl in which to plant them. Make sure that you use a container that has a drainage hole at the bottom. If your favorite bowl doesn’t have one, you can drill holes on the bottom.

Next, you will want to find a potting mix of your choice. There are mixes that are specifically crafted for succulents, but you can also create your own with potting soil and sand. Keep in mind that succulents do not thrive with wet roots. Watering will be a breeze, as succulents require very little.

And finally, it’s no secret that succulents love sun—wherever you chose to “house” your plant, make sure there is plenty of sunshine for growth (ideally six to eight hours of sun daily).

For more tips and instructions to creating your own succulent garden, visit Lowe’s.

Now that you have all the tools to become a master succulent gardener, we would love to see the results of what you create! Join our community with the hashtag #SevilleSucculents. We look forward to sharing some of your favorites!

Happy planting!

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